For When You Can't Have The Real Thing
[ start | index | login ]
start > Sun > Jumpstart > x86 Boot Floppy

x86 Boot Floppy

Created by dave. Last edited by dave, 12 years and 291 days ago. Viewed 3,219 times. #4
[diff] [history] [edit] [rdf]
labels
attachments

Creating the boot floppy

How to create the Device Configuration Assistant Floppy for Solaris 9
There is a diskette image on CD 2 and on the DVD. These images are all the same. The path to the image is:

  • Solaris_9/Tools/d1_image
How to create the Device Configuration Assistant Floppy for Solaris 10 3/05
There is a diskette image on CDs 2, 3, and 4, and on the DVD. These images are all the same. The path to the image is:
  • Solaris_10/Tools/d1_image
This file should be written to a formatted floppy diskette using the 'dd' command (Solaris, Linux).

NOTE: This procedure does not apply to Solaris 10 1/06 or later releases, where the boot process is now based on GNU GRUB and no longer requires real-mode drivers, and thus also does not use the Device Configuration Assistant.

For further information on this updated boot process, please see the BigAdmin feature article ">>GRUB and the Solaris 10 1/06 OS: The New Bootloader for x86 Platforms".

(>>Source)

Modifying the boot floppy

With that done, there are some modifications to make. Firstly, mount the disk in any machine (I think it will work even in a DOS/Windows machine) and edit the solaris/bootenv.rc file and add:

setprop auto-boot? true
setprop auto-boot-cfg-num -1
setprop auto-boot-timeout 5
This enable the automatic bootup.

Next, you will have to boot with this disk at least once so as to enumerate the hardware and create a hardware profile on the diskette for future reference. Also, when presented with the boot options (CD, DISK or NET), change the autoboot settings to default to "NET" installs (you will get a boot path of something like /pci@0,0/pci8086,1@e; this will vary with different network cards and other hardware, so do different boot disks will be required for different hardware configs). With this saved, you should be able to simply put the disk in and it will select a network boot automatically.

(>>Source)

no comments | post comment
This is a collection of techical information, much of it learned the hard way. Consider it a lab book or a /info directory. I doubt much of it will be of use to anyone else.

Useful:


snipsnap.org | Copyright 2000-2002 Matthias L. Jugel and Stephan J. Schmidt